Hudson residents object to proposed townhouse development

Phil Keren
Kent Weeklies
Many residents are objecting to a proposal for a 16-unit townhouse development on Barlow Road east of state Route 91. The project was slated to be discussed at the planning commission meeting on June 14, but has been pulled from the agenda. It may appear on the planning commission's agenda on July 12.

HUDSON — A group of residents are objecting to a proposal for a 16-unit townhouse development along Barlow Road east of state Route 91.

Matthew Neff of Brecksville is asking planning commission to approve a conditional use request so that the 2,700-square-foot townhouses can be built on a 3-acre parcel near the intersection of Barlow Road and Argyle Drive. The property owner is M7 Realty LLC of Westlake.

Kristen Schell said she and many other residents who live in an adjacent neighborhood oppose the project because of its density and due to the expected removal of a large amount of trees that have provided their homes with a buffer from the businesses and the roads.

"As they were proposed, the townhouses were clearly a profit-driven project with very little consideration of the impact on surrounding homes or [the] neighborhood," Schell said.

She noted residents were not aware of the project until a sign was recently posted on the lot eyed for the development.

Schell said a group of volunteers are now canvassing their neighborhood asking residents to sign a petition in opposition to the project. 

"There were a lot of neighbors quite happy to sign it," Schell said.

This project was set to be discussed at the planning commission meeting on June 14, but was pulled from the agenda because the applicant wants more time to study the issue and revise their proposal, according to city officials.

City staff said the proposal may be resubmitted in time for the planning commission meeting on July 12. If that happens, the sign will be re-posted and notification letters will be sent out.

Schell said neighbors will review the revised proposal once it's submitted to the city planning department.

"We're hoping that they can reduce the density significantly," Schell said. "We're also hoping they can find a way to lessen the impact on neighbors' larger setbacks, keeping more mature trees for a buffer."

Reporter Phil Keren can be reached at pkeren@thebeaconjournal.com, or on Twitter at @keren_phil.