More than a dozen vehicles broken into in Cuyahoga Falls

Marsha McKenna
Kent Weeklies
Numerous vehicles were broken into on Christmas Eve. Police said two suspects were videoed by a Ring camera. One of them can be seen here. Images of the other suspect were too blurred to make out any features, police said.

It seems two Grinches were apparently making rounds during the holiday season in one Cuyahoga Falls neighborhood.

According to an email Monday with incident reports from over the holidays, Cuyahoga Falls Police received multiple reports the morning of Dec. 24 of vehicle break-ins, some with multiple vehicles affected. Officers responded to complaints from Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and 11th streets, in the 2400, 2500, 2700 and 2800 blocks.

"Some cars were rummaged through, but nothing was taken," said Lt. Chris Davies. "Some had wallets stolen. Some had significant loss, but most did not have a high volume of loss."

Davies said that the cases were most likely related, since they took place around the same time in the early morning hours on Christmas Eve, and in the same general area.

Davies said between 16 and 18 vehicles were reported broken into during the time frame. Many of the cars were ransacked, some with damage, while others had thefts of purses, wallets, credit cards, music CDs and cash. The largest loss reported was a purse, credit cards, $200 in cash and a bag of Christmas presents valued at $200. Davies said that the number of cars involved was not necessarily unusual. He added that all the vehicles were unlocked.

Davies said that as of Wednesday, there was no reports of any stolen credit cards being used.

"It seems the biggest thing they were after was cash," Davies said. 

The break-ins appeared to have occurred overnight and videos were available on some of them.

Police suspect two males were involved. A Ring camera captured an image of two males, although one was too out of focus to make out detail.

The two suspects were most likely walking the neighborhood looking for unlocked vehicles, Davies said. 

"Very seldom are cars actually broken into," Davies said. "Most are cars that were unlocked. Usually, when you see suspects in the cameras, you can see them trying to get in [to a locked car], and they move on. Don’t leave your car unlocked, and don’t leave anything visible inside."

Police said two suspects were videoed by a Ring camera. Between 16 and 18 vehicles were reported broken into on Christmas Eve. One of them can be seen here. Images of the other suspect were too blurred to make out any features, police said.