Political campaign donations build water well in Africa

Kent Weeklies
Mike Rasor asked his donors to stop sending checks to his campaign for Summit County Clerk of Courts, and begin sending them to Living Water, a 501(c)(3) organization that builds water wells in Third World countries, shown here.

Mike Rasor of Stow ran for Summit County Clerk of Courts, promising that a more efficient clerk’s office would free up funds for Summit County’s infrastructure needs. Rasor lost, but an infrastructure project will begin nonetheless — in Kenya.

In October, Rasor said he sensed his odds of winning were not favorable. He asked his donors to stop sending checks to his campaign, and begin sending them to Living Water, a 501(c)(3) organization that builds water wells in Third World countries. The campaign met its goal of raising $6,000, which is the approximate cost to construct a water well.

“We lost the race, but we saved lives in Kenya,” Rasor said. “It’s a net win — and it’s not even close.”

In Kenya and throughout the third world, 840,000 people die annually of diarrhea from a lack of clean drinking water. Globally, women and children spend 200 million hours every day collecting water, often for water that’s already contaminated. As COVID-19 spreads, water is a critical element for hand washing.