Are You a Founder, Settler, Pioneer, or Squatter? Test your knowledge of Aurora’s history – Quiz #3

John Kudley Jr.
Special to the Aurora Advocate

This week’s test of your knowledge of Aurora’s history will have you identifying artifacts from the Aurora Historical Society’s museum collection.

But before that, how did you do with last week’s quiz in which you had to identify buildings in the five photos? Here are the answers:

Photo 1 – The original Aurora Country Club clubhouse, built in 1925 as part of the A.B. Smythe “Commuter Village” development. The central portion was initially a cheese warehouse.

Photo 2 – Slick’s Dinner and the Pennzoil gas station located on the northwest corner of routes 82 and 43 where CVS is now located.

Photo 3 – The Erie Railroad Depot located on Station Street which runs behind Geauga Lake. It was the place where passengers began their outings to the amusement park.

Photo 4 – The grandstand at Grandview Race Track (also known as Bainbridge Park Race Track) was located north of the old Geauga Lake Park along Route 43 in Aurora, south of Pettibone Road. It is now the site of the Marketplace II shopping center, which includes Home Depot and Target. The grandstand was destroyed in a 1956 fire.

Photo 5 – Originally the C.R. Harmon & Son store located on S. Chillicothe Rd. (Rte.43) just south of the 1815 Tavern. It was once the home of Hackbart’s Grocery, Chet Edwards General Home Furnishings, and now the Wayside Workshop.

Give yourself 2 points for each photo you identified correctly. Where did you fall on the grading scale? In you scored10 points you are a “Founder,” 8 points a “Pioneer,” 6 points a “Settler,” 4 points a “Newcomer,” and 2 points a “Squatter.” Missed them all? We know you’re just a “Visitor.”

Now for the third and final chance to prove yourself to be knowledgeable of Aurora’s history. How good are you at identifying everyday objects people used in the 1800s and into the early 1900s? The five artifacts in their day were the latest labor saving devices that greatly improved the quality of one’s life.

Artifact 1 – This artifact was found in most homes with larger variations found in grocery stores. While it made life easier, today we would not have the patience to use this in our rush to get ready in the morning for the day’s activities. What is this artifact?

Artifact 1 – This artifact was found in most homes with larger variations found in grocery stores. While it made life easier, today we would not have the patience to use this in our rush to get ready in the morning for the day’s activities. What is this artifact?

Artifact 2 – The use of this artifact was the second step in a process after having allowed its contents to set for several days or after having used a separator. This is hand cranked device with larger versions were often powered by sheep or dogs. What is this artifact?

Artifact 2 – The use of this artifact was the second step in a process after having allowed its contents to set for several days or after having used a separator. This is hand cranked device with larger versions were often powered by sheep or dogs. What is this artifact?

Artifact 3 – Patented in 1909 this artifact was one of the earliest electrical devices used in the home. Modern versions have been made much safer to use. What is this artifact?

Artifact 3 – Patented in 1909 this artifact was one of the earliest electrical devices used in the home. Modern versions have been made much safer to use. What is this artifact?

Artifact 4 – This artifact was essential when riding in a buggy. More importantly it was used while sitting through a long day Sunday’s church service. What is this artifact?

Artifact 4 – This artifact was essential when riding in a buggy. More importantly it was used while sitting through a long day Sunday’s church service. What is this artifact?

Artifact 5 – Be careful with identifying this last artifact. Looks can be deceiving. It was an essential and convenient item that was used in homes into the early 1900s. What is this artifact?

Artifact 5 – Be careful with identifying this last artifact. Looks can be deceiving. It was an essential and convenient item that was used in homes into the early 1900s. What is this artifact?

Answers to this week’s quiz will be printed in the next issue of the Advocate. You can also visit the Aurora Historical Society’s Facebook page at Aurora Historical Society to find the answers. Use the same scoring and ranking used for the identification of the photos. Leave a comment on our page. Let us know what other things you would like to learn about Aurora’s history.

Printed with the permission of the Aurora Historical Society which retains rights to all content and photos.