With the concern for coronavirus (COVID-19) growing in the community and throughout Summit County, the city has received questions about what to do if you think you have COVID-19 and when to call Hudson EMS.

As more cases are identified, the EMS service might become overburdened, so it is important that people only call 911 for life-threatening medical emergencies. These include chest pain, difficulty breathing, choking, difficulty speaking, drowning, numbness, poisoning, sudden intense pain, severe burns, suicide threat, and other serious medical problems.

What to do if you think you may have Coronavirus?

First, don’t panic. Your symptoms could be allergies, common cold, or flu — but it’s best to be sure. You have a few different options for receiving care. If you’re showing symptoms, such as fever and cough, the safest place to be — for you and for everyone else — is in your home.

Primary Care

When you have mild symptoms that are not life-threatening, call your doctor’s office first before calling 911 or going to the emergency room. Most people with mild symptoms will be told to isolate at home. Your physician can also determine if you should be tested for COVID-19 and where to go for that test.

Video Visits

Seek out opportunities to use video doctor’s visits. This is a great way to avoid leaving home when you are ill and still receive medical assistance.

Emergency Care

In case of a life-threatening medical emergency, call 911. That means difficulty breathing or another emergency medical conditions. If your symptoms are getting worse, but are not life-threatening have someone drive you to the Emergency Room, but only after you have called the ER first so they can prepare for your arrival. If you call 911, be honest about your signs and symptoms. Do not embellish the severity of your issues hoping to get a faster or higher priority response. It could keep us from responding to someone with serious life-threatening symptoms.

When Not to Call 911

• For medical advice about whether to go to the hospital or not.

• For non-urgent medical issues, such as sprains, cuts, or other medical conditions that are not life-threatening. These can be handled through your physician.

• For transportation to the hospital for issues that are not life-threatening.

• For a request to be tested for COVID-19. EMS does not do testing.

• For non-medical or police related issues like power outages, water issues, or other concerns that are not emergency medical or safety situations. Every call we answer that is not an emergency, delays care to those who truly need it.

Working together and being mindful when to use 911, we can make sure everyone receives the emergency medical care that they need as quickly as possible.