HUDSON — A $4.4 million project to install left turn lanes in three locations along State Route 91 (Main Street), add sidewalks and bike lanes, and improve storm sewers and lighting is expected to happen next year, according to Hudson officials.

The turn lane installation work is eyed for a 1.2-mile stretch of State Route 91 from Brandywine Creek Drive, north over the Ohio Turnpike to Middleton Road, according to Brad Kosco, engineer for the city of Hudson.

"The SR 91 North Turn Lane Improvements project is part of City Council’s continuing emphasis on improving the city roadways," said Jody Roberts, the city’s communications manager.

Designated left turn lanes will be added along Route 91 at Valley View Road, Herrick Park Drive and Hines Hill Road to "increase safety and enhance the traffic flow," said Roberts. Other features of the project include adding bicycle lanes and a sidewalk on the east side of the road, improving the storm sewer system, and installing improved lighting at the intersections.

The project is being funded with both state and local money, according to Roberts.

Kosco said the project design is finished and he expects the work to be bid in late fall. Roberts said the work is expected to happen in 2020.

Kosco said that while two-way traffic will be maintained throughout the project, "lane closures are anticipated."

In addition to the city’s turn lane lane project, Roberts said the city of Akron is putting in a new water main from Herrick Park Drive north to Middleton Road.

Multiple parcels must be acquired for project

Kosco said the city is working on either permanently obtaining parcels or acquiring temporary easements for pieces of land along the project route. The city needs to secure 48 separate parcels — encompassing 45 separate owners — for the project.

Roberts said the pieces of property that need to be acquired range from about 0.001 acre to 0.186 acres along Route 91. Permanent acquisitions will be done for areas where infrastructure such as a sidewalk or storm sewer will be located, according to Roberts. Meanwhile, the temporary easements that the city needs to secure will generally be used for grading and construction work, and last about three years.

"Each parcel is appraised for fair market value, and the property owner receives payment for the strip of land being acquired," said Roberts.

About 27 property owners have agreed to the city’s acquisition offer thus far and the city is continuing negotiations with the remaining property owners, she said.

Reporter Phil Keren can be reached at 330-541-9421, pkeren@recordpub.com, or on Twitter at @keren_phil.